Humanities Indicators
Facebook Twitter YouTube
Home > Higher Education > Departmental Survey > 2012-13 Humanities Departmental Survey (HDS-2) > Humanities Departments and Workforce Preparation
Humanities Departments and Workforce Preparation: Key Findings from the 2012–13 Humanities Departmental Survey

The Humanities Departmental Survey (HDS-2), in response to persistent questions, explored how humanities departments prepared their students for the workforce; for example, whether they offered such programs to students within the department, or courses in other professional schools or programs. (The degree-granting departments and programs studied in HDS-2 were all at four-year colleges and universities.)

Key findings:

  • About one-third of humanities departments had a professional program (such as a teacher credentialing program within a history department or a journalism program within an English department, Figure 1).
  • Disciplines with a substantial presence in the secondary school curriculum had the highest proportions of departments offering professional programs to their students. While 48% of the English departments and 40% of the history departments offered a professional program, only 5% of philosophy departments reported offering similar programs.
  • The HDS-2 asked departments to indicate whether they offered—or went further and required—various types of occupationally oriented activities for students. Fifty-eight percent of departments offered their undergraduates employment-related presentations by employers, employees, and alumni; 62% offered undergraduates internships in an employment setting; and 44% offered occupationally oriented coursework or workshops (Figure 2). A small fraction of the humanities departments required their students to engage in occupationally oriented activities. The activity required by the largest share of departments was an internship, a requirement of 10% of the departments. Among the traditional humanities disciplines, only in English and religion did 10% or more of the departments require an internship. In comparison, 36% of the communication departments required this activity.
  • A majority of departments with humanities PhD programs provided experiences designed to prepare their doctoral students for nonacademic employment, with 59% offering presentations by employers, employees, or alumni; 65% offering their doctoral students internships in employment settings; and 55% offering occupationally oriented coursework or workshops (Figure 3).
  • Seventy-two percent of humanities departments were housed within an institution with a professional school. Of the humanities departments in these institutions, 21% had faculty members who taught courses in the professional school (Figure 4). Among philosophy departments, although only 5% had a professional program, 24% of those at colleges and universities with a professional school had faculty who taught courses in the professional school.
  • Humanities faculty and graduate students taught approximately 11,210 courses in professional schools during the 2011–12 academic year.

Tables

Departments with Professional Programs and/or Instruction in Professional Schools

Occupationally Oriented Activities for Undergraduate Students

Occupationally Oriented Activities for Doctoral Students

HDS2-Wor1: Percentage of Humanities Departments with Professional Programs, by Discipline, Fall 2012

* A combined department is one that grants degrees in English and also in languages and literatures other than English.

Source: Susan White, Raymond Chu, and Roman Czujko,  The 2012–13 Survey of Humanities Departments at Four-Year Institutions, Table 19, p. 28 (College Park, MD: Statistical Research Center, American Institute of Physics, 2014). Study conducted for the American Academy of Arts Sciences’ Humanities Indicators Project.

HDS2-Wor2: Percentage of Humanities Departments Offering or Requiring Occupationally Oriented Activities for Undergraduate Students, by Activity, Academic Year 2011–12

* Includes job fairs geared to the interests of the department’s majors.

Source: Susan White, Raymond Chu, and Roman Czujko,  The 2012–13 Survey of Humanities Departments at Four-Year Institutions, Table 20, p. 29 (College Park, MD: Statistical Research Center, American Institute of Physics, 2014). Study conducted for the American Academy of Arts Sciences’ Humanities Indicators Project.

About this Data
HDS2-Wor3: Percentage of Humanities Departments Offering or Requiring Occupationally Oriented Activities for Doctoral Students, by Activity, Academic Year 2011–12 (Nonacademic Employment Only)

* Includes job fairs geared to the interests of the department’s doctoral students.

Source: Susan White, Raymond Chu, and Roman Czujko,  The 2012–13 Survey of Humanities Departments at Four-Year Institutions, Table 21, p. 20 (College Park, MD: Statistical Research Center, American Institute of Physics, 2014). Study conducted for the American Academy of Arts Sciences’ Humanities Indicators Project.

About this Data
HDS2-Wor4: Percentage of Humanities Departments Offering Undergraduate or Graduate Courses in Professional Schools, by Discipline, Fall 2012

* As a share of all departments housed in institutions with professional school(s).
** A combined department is one that grants degrees in English and also in languages and literatures other than English.

Source: Susan White, Raymond Chu, and Roman Czujko,  The 2012–13 Survey of Humanities Departments at Four-Year Institutions, Table 19, p. 28 (College Park, MD: Statistical Research Center, American Institute of Physics, 2014). Study conducted for the American Academy of Arts Sciences’ Humanities Indicators Project.